• Robert Smithson: Time Crystals
    Monash University Museum of Art
    21 Jul –
    22 Sep 2018
    By Philip Brophy
    Spiral Jetty and Swamp in Robert Smithson: Time Crystals
    25 Aug 2018

    Double Issue This week Memo Review publishes two separate reviews of Robert Smithson: Time Crystals at Monash University Museum of Art.

    Below Philip Brophy considers the sound that lightly floats throughout the gallery's spaces, emanating from two films: Robert Smithson's Spiral Jetty (1970) and Nancy Holt and Robert Smithson's Swamp (1971).

    Francis Plagne, whose review is available by clicking here, considers the exhibition as a whole, including an in-depth engagement with the curators' positioning of Smithson's practice. ** The survey of works, models and materials in Robert Smithson: Time Crystals at MUMA is a fascinating opportunity not simply to view Smithson's work, but also to reflect on his methods and theories. The exhibition draws upon Chris McAuliffe and Amelia Barikin's deep and longstanding interest in Smithson and the legacy of his notions of planetary and geological temporality in shaping physical construction (and hence, sculpture as we knew it). A key feature of the exhibition is the framing of the MUMA site with two darkened chambers, each exhibiting a projection of a landmark land art film: Robert Smithson's Spiral Jetty (1970) and Nancy Holt and Robert Smithson's Swamp* (1971). Their conjoined audio lightly floats throughout the other five chambers.

    This review will consider that floating sound.

    Spiral Jetty is an exemplar of the museographic sub-category of cinema usually referred to as the 'artist's film'. Taken at its prescribed value, the 'artist's film' exhibits a belief in artists bringing to the medium of film something more, other, different or even essential about cinema and moving image-making. It's a Romantic dream, more in line with Courbet's heroics than McLuhan's specifics. Mostly, artists' films and videos betray a shallow understanding of cinema history and form, and the complex cultural positioning of movies and their purpose. However, through this core contradiction (a delusion in many contemporary instances) the 'artist's film' can evidence a rich multivalence in many an artist's conceptual rhetoric.

    Robert Smithson, Stills from the Spiral Jetty Film 1970 (panel A), gelatin silver photographs, three panels: each with twelve photographs, each panel 66 x 111.8 cm; overall 66 x 345.4 cm. Collection: The National Museum of Art, Architecture and Design, Oslo, Norway. Photo: Morten Thorkildsen. © Holt-Smithson Foundation/VAGA. Licensed by Viscopy, 2017.

    Spiral Jetty is mostly a systematic documentary of the eponymous land art construction sited at the edge of Utah's Great Salt Lake. The film's bulk records the planning and making of the work, plus a literal and optical survey of the new land construct engineered by Smithson. As this artwork continues to morph ecologically, politically and historically as a site of entropic environmental endeavour, the film provides a sense of the work's physical gestation and final sculpting. Like much large scale land art since, the recording of its procedural manifestation clarifies the conceptual priorities behind such projects. Smithson's ruminations on the filmmaking process (especially its post-production) angle an insight into film's self-preserving archival function. Through documenting Spiral Jetty, he characterized film as "an archeozoic medium" and the edit suite's mechanics akin to "a time machine".

    One can also reflect on the state and status of the ghostly living archive of Spiral Jetty as it is animated once more in a museum setting decades after its initial encoding. The filmed footage captures—or, more so, stages—Smithson as a figure in his own landscape in ways that can reorient a counter reading of conceptual art in general as a return to Romantic ideals of the landscape. Smithson haunts Spiral Jetty like the chilling Rückenfigur of Caspar David Friedrich's dark pastoral settings. More than half of Friedrich's landscapes painted between roughly 1810 to 1830 feature a diminutive figure (sometimes two) facing away from the viewer. This faceless persona could likely be a projected fusion of Friedrich and his young brother—who died before his eyes slipping into a lake whose ice cracked under their feet. For Friedrich, the ground literally swallowed humanity, in the process forging a notion of landscape as a non-humancentric life force. Standing before Friedrich's paintings—none of which are monumental in scale—is a haunting experience that can empty the self if one is so disposed.

    Robert Smithson during the building of Spiral Jetty, 1970 Rozel Point, Great Salt Lake, Utah, 1 April 1970. Photograph: Gianfranco Gorgoni.\ Reproduced courtesy of Gianfranco Gorgoni.

    Smithson never evacuates himself from Spiral Jetty. His back faces us because we are positioned to follow him, like a Vernian explorer of new worlds in modern art's own reconfigured fin de siècle: the sixties. While the intention might be for Smithson to position him as a reference for scale to diagrammatically indicate the human's relation to massive swathes of land, the film performs a counter measure in its alignment of the artist with intrepid and ingenious explorers. The film might be ambiguous about this, but conceptual art is rarely ambiguous: it often trades in po-faced statistics in order to disarm a poetry-hungry audience. Smithson's voice intones statistics in the film's opening, placing himself in the centre of the artwork and reciting compass readings and geological assessments of what lies before him in each positional sector. It's a de-humanising tone, born of an American vernacular recitation which is audible in the Beat poetry of William Burroughs and John Giorno through to the minimalist oratories of Robert Wilson and Robert Ashley.

    But in the film, this voice is textually omnipresent. Positioned in post-production as an extradiegetic aural effect, its 'voice from beyond the frame' correlates to the godly directives heard by Moses and countless schizophrenics since. Smithson's body is visibly located in the film like a Letraset 'figure' pasted onto the architectural plan; his voice floats above, in the realm of architectural vision. Over-extended helicopter shots reinforce the latter. Smithson's 'voice-over narration' is less a comment on narrative proceedings and more a declaration of principles of existence, as if he is directing his own world-making. At the film's conclusion, the echoic Vulcan clangs matched to shots of archaeological artefacts evoke an imaginary 'big bang' of worldly creation. Smithson might be linking his land art to non-expressive action, but the film's audiovision implies he is engaged in a supra-creative act by shaping earthly matter. Ultimately, Spiral Jetty bears witness to a Promethean feat; Smithson's own voice is its testament.

    Robert Smithson: Time Crystals, Monash University Museum of Art, installation view: Monash University Museum of Art, Melbourne, 2018. Photo: Christian Capurro.

    Smithson's notes on the project (edited by Nancy Holt) notably reflect on the filmmaking process. His comments on Spiral Jetty the artwork and Spiral Jetty the film blur to an extent, suggesting that the film afforded him a critical perspective on his project (cinematographically due to the helicopter shots; semantically through the montage), which is voiced by the soundtrack. Visual artists are often amazed and excited by the post-production of a film's soundtrack, and Spiral Jetty grapples with the extended passage of reconstruction that all films undergo, as editors and directors slavishly ponder, query, interrogate and transform the original directorial, performative and cinematographic intentions now frozen in celluloid's unforgiving amber. Yet it is in the mysteries of audiovision that all films audit the textual chaos of their signification. The rumbling bulldozers and the droning helicopter smear the film with an industrial aural patina, rendering in sound if not 'napalm in the morning' at least diesel fuel atomised across the desolate Utah terrain. Importantly, these seeming contradictions, I would argue, deepen the value of Spiral Jetty, and afford a repositioning of it beyond the authorial ascription so often insisted on by the 'artist's film'. Thus, Spiral Jetty is ultimately a signpost of land development, the creation of added-value real estate, and the attendant noise of site construction.

    The voice of Smithson also features in the collaborative film he made with Nancy Holt one year later, Swamp. Vocality sears the surface of this film. Holt holds the 16mm camera, and moves forward into the marshy terrain goaded by Smithson off-camera to "go straight", "keep going", "go further", etc. Smithson recorded the sound "wild" onto a reel recorder (that is, un-synched to the camera, using the system known then as "crystal sync", which employed quartz for temporal stability in the recorder's speed as developed for Seiko watches - but that's another story). This sound was then appended to the ostensibly silent footage.

    Robert Smithson: Time Crystals, Monash University Museum of Art, installation view: Monash University Museum of Art, Melbourne, 2018. Photo: Christian Capurro.

    It's a fascinating social document. The eyes of the wife being told to see what the husband declares, Swamp is more of a domestic power struggle than a visual pondering of naturalised non-site messiness as a micro-environment of spatiality. Like the blaring industrial machinery of Spiral Jetty, Swamp's audiovisuality captures the mismatch between godly directives and mortal behaviour. Smith's vocabulary of penetration could be lifted straight from a porno shoot. Here, we are now perhaps deviating too far from Holt and Smithson's artistic concerns and the MUMA exhibition's curatorial frame, but the film's status as archival document lends it to readings in concert with other concurrent documents. As the camera timidly cuts a path through the swamp and reeds, it documents Holt and Smithson's joint struggle to traverse a natural domain limiting human egress. It also collapses metaphor and metonym in filming Holt's bodily POV as directed by Smithson's narrational POV, for this is precisely what happens in the deployment of hand-held cameras in terror and horror films. The increase in sexualised violence in the cinema throughout the sixties can be traced across near countless examples of woman frantically wandering through impenetrable nature: forests, woods, deserts, swamps. The camera held in the hand—like an artist wields a brush—has always been there to capture the sensational thrill of her descent into the brutish non-human centric world, where man becomes animal and woman becomes meat.

    It's pretty difficult to watch Swamp and not think of this—despite the fact that the film also perfectly documents Holt and Smithson's filmically rendered proposal of the swamp as a 'geo-chronic' site. Inside the bracketed dark zones of the MUMA exhibition, one could be transported to these other worlds of supreme archaeological statement and sculptural redefinition—for which Smithson and Holt deserve their historical footholds. Their soundtracks aid in reminding one of that which exists beyond those worlds.

    Philip Brophy writes on art among other things.

    Title image: Robert Smithson, Spiral Jetty 1970 (still), digital transfer of 16 mm film, colour, sound 32:00 minutes Courtesy of Electronic Arts Intermix, New York. Image courtesy of Holt-Smithson Foundation © Holt-Smithson Foundation/VAGA. Licensed by Viscopy, 2017.)


    2020 #21 Rex Butler Jane Sutherland, Obstruction, Box Hill 1887 Art Gallery of Ballarat
    2020 #20 Amelia Winata John Nixon, Groups + Pairs 2016-2020 Anna Schwartz Gallery
    2020 #19 Chelsea Hopper Justine Varga, Tachisme Tolarno Galleries
    2020 #18 Anna Parlane Patrick Pound, The Museum of There, Not There STATION
    2020 #17 Kate Meakin “Apparel” Neon Parc Brunswick
    2020 #16 Robert Schubert Terre Thaemlitz, Love Bomb/Ai No Bakudan The SUBSTATION
    2020 #15 Philip Brophy Lewis Fidock and Joshua Petherick, Weevils in the Flour Gertrude Contemporary
    2020 #14 Jane Eckett Virginia Cuppaidge, The Skyspace Paintings 1977 - 1982 Nicholas Thompson Gallery
    2020 #13 Rex Butler Callum Morton, Monument #32: Helter Shelter Alfred Deakin Place Ballarat
    2020 #12 Amelia Winata Ari Tampubolon, Symposia: This show is dedicated to K-pop girl group, TWICE. I love you. SEVENTH Gallery
    2020 #11 Giles Fielke Warwick Baker, Hi-Vis Dreams Centre for Contemporary Photography
    2020 #10 Amelia Wallin Agatha Gothe-Snape, The Outcome is Certain Monash University Museum of Art
    2020 #09 Audrey Schmidt Alethea Everard, Art show Meow2
    2020 #08 Chelsea Hopper Elizabeth Gower, LOCATIONS Sutton Gallery, Sutton Projects
    2020 #07 Paris Lettau KAWS: Companionship in the Age of Loneliness NGV International
    2020 #06 Victoria Perin Assembled: The Art of Robert Klippel Tarrawarra Museum of Art
    2019 #51 Luke Smythe Colin McCahon: Letters and Numbers National Gallery of Victoria
    2019 #50 David Wlazlo 110%: Wet Nurse c3 Contemporary Art Space
    2019 #49 Helen O'Toole Luke Sands Guzzler
    2019 #48 David Homewood Robert Hunter Ian Potter Centre: NGV Australia
    2019 #47 Giles Fielke Kate Wallace, Views to Remember / Travis McDonald, Clock Face C3 Contemporary Art Space
    2019 #46 Audrey Schmidt In Costume Mejia
    2019 #45 Marnie Edmiston Collection leads: John Scurry—small paintings Geelong Gallery
    2019 #44 Rex Butler Collecting Comme National Gallery of Victoria
    2019 #43 Francis Plagne Elizabeth Newman Neon Parc City
    2019 #42 Amelia Winata Preparation Haydens
    2019 #41 Victoria Perin Never the same river Anna Schwartz Gallery
    2019 #40 Philip Brophy Haroon Mirza: The Construction of an Act Australian Centre for Contemporary Art
    2019 #39 Matthew Linde Balenciaga: Shaping Fashion Bendigo Art Gallery
    2019 #38 Maddee Clark Fiona Foley: Who are these strangers and where are they going? Ballarat International Foto Biennale
    2019 #37 Giles Fielke Karrabing Film Collective: The Mermaids, or Aiden in Wonderland KINGS Artist Run
    2019 #36 Aneta Trajkoski SERIAL McClelland Sculpture Park+Gallery
    2019 #34 Philip Brophy ...(illegible)... MADA Gallery
    2019 #32 Ella Cattach On Vulnerability and Doubt Australian Centre for Contemporary Art
    2019 #31 Helen O'Toole George Egerton-Warburton, also known as , Heide Museum of Modern Art
    2019 #30 Victoria Perin, Brendan Casey I will never run out of lies nor love Bus Projects
    2019 #29 Anna Parlane FEM-aFFINITY Arts Project Australia
    2019 #28 Jane Eckett Josef Stanislaw Ostoja-Kotkowski: Solid Light McClelland Sculpture Park+Gallery
    2019 #27 Elyssia Bugg Prima Materia Bundoora Homestead
    2019 #26 Amelia Winata Angelica Mesiti: ASSEMBLY Venice Biennale
    2019 #25 Rex Butler Hans and Nora Heysen: Two Generations of Australian Art Ian Potter Centre: NGV Australia
    2019 #24 Francis Plagne Janet Burchill and Jennifer McCamley: Temptation to Co-exist Heide Museum of Modern Art
    2019 #23 Audrey Schmidt Octopus 19: Ventriloquy Gertrude Contemporary
    2019 #22 Anna Parlane Serene Velocity in Practice: MC510/CS183 Monash University Museum of Art
    2019 #21 Sophie Knezic Arlo Mountford: Deep Revolt Shepparton Art Museum
    2019 #21 Philip Brophy Christian Thompson: Baya Gardiya Australian Centre for the Moving Image
    2019 #20 Victoria Perin Isabel Davies: Recent Geometric Constructions Stephen McLaughlan Gallery
    2019 #19 Chelsea Hopper Taryn Simon: Contraband Anna Schwartz Gallery
    2019 #18 Rex Butler Tracey Moffatt: Body Remembers Tarrawarra Museum of Art
    2019 #17 Stephen Palmer Amalia Lindo: Computer Shoulders Centre for Contemporary Photography
    2019 #16 Giles Fielke Carve A Future, Devour Everything, Become Something Ian Potter Centre: NGV Australia
    2019 #15 David Wlazlo Compromise Warrnambool Art Gallery
    2019 #14 Ella Cattach Emma Phillips: Too Much to Dream Reading Room
    2019 #13 Paris Lettau The Museological Consciousness Lyon Housemuseum Galleries, Meow
    2019 #13 The Editors Memo Review 01. Perimeter Books, World Food Books, Monash University Museum of Art
    2019 #12 Giles Fielke Tudors to Windsors: British Royal Portraits Bendigo Art Gallery
    2019 #11 Sophie Knezic The Tennis Piece Gertrude Contemporary
    2019 #10 Victoria Perin Papermade / John Nixon: Screenprints, Woodblocks & Unique Relief Prints Negative Press, Australian Galleries
    2019 #09 Francis Plagne Visions of Paradise: Indian Court Paintings National Gallery of Victoria
    2019 #08 Amelia Winata Daniel von Sturmer Anna Schwartz Gallery
    2019 #07 Audrey Schmidt Carny Neon Parc
    2019 #06 Rex Butler Christian Marclay: The Clock Australian Centre for the Moving Image
    2019 #05 Anna Parlane Marlene Gilson Art Gallery of Ballarat
    2018 #52 Memo Review Thanks for reading in 2018
    2018 #51 Victoria Perin Sweeney Reed and Strines Gallery Heide Museum of Modern Art
    2018 #50 Paris Lettau Katie West: warna (ground) Caves
    2018 #49 Audrey Schmidt Aesthetics, Politics and Histories: The Social Context of Art AAANZ Conference 2018 - RMIT University
    2018 #49 The Editors Does the art exhibition have a future? AAANZ Conference 2018 - RMIT University
    2018 #48 Rex Butler Mira Gojak and Takehito Koganezawa: The Garden of Forking Paths Buxton Contemporary
    2018 #47 Jane Eckett Clement Meadmore: The art of mid-century design Ian Potter Museum of Art
    2018 #46 Francis Plagne Spencer Lai: A smile forms into a grimace / Matilda Davis: Too Many Dinner Parties Bus Projects
    2018 #45 Anna Parlane Lili Reynaud-Dewar, TEETH, GUMS, MACHINES, FUTURE, SOCIETY / Alicia Frankovich, Exoplanets Monash University Museum of Art
    2018 #44 Amelia Winata Hito Steyerl: Factory of the Sun National Gallery of Victoria
    2018 #43 David Wlazlo Biennale of Australian Art Art Gallery of Ballarat
    2018 #42 Giles Fielke Anne Ferran: White Against Red Sutton Gallery
    2018 #41 Sophie Knezic Eavesdropping Ian Potter Museum of Art
    2018 #41 Benison Kilby State of the Union Ian Potter Museum of Art
    2018 #40 Tim Alves John Stezaker: Lost World Centre for Contemporary Photography
    2018 #39 Paris Lettau Brook Andrew: The Language of Skulls Ten Cubed
    2018 #38 Jane Eckett Design for Life: Grant and Mary Featherston Heide Museum of Modern Art
    2018 #37 Rex Butler Tom Roberts: Shearing the Rams National Gallery of Victoria
    2018 #36 Victoria Perin Baldessin / Whiteley: Parallel Visions National Gallery of Victoria
    2018 #35 Hester Lyon Architecture Makes Us: Cinematic Visions of Sonia Leber and David Chesworth Centre for Contemporary Photography
    2018 #34 Francis Plagne Robert Smithson: Time Crystals Monash University Museum of Art
    2018 #34 Philip Brophy Robert Smithson: Time Crystals Monash University Museum of Art
    2018 #33 Amelia Winata Nicholas Mangan, Termite Economies Sutton Gallery
    2018 #32 Giles Fielke Philadelphia Wireman World Food Books
    2018 #31 Victoria Perin, David Wlazlo, Amelia Winata Melbourne Art Fair & Spring 1883 Australian Centre for Contemporary Art, Windsor Hotel
    2018 #30 Anna Parlane A Lightness of Spirit is the Measure of Happiness Australian Centre for Contemporary Art
    2018 #29 Giles Fielke, Amelia Winata, Tiarney Miekus Best and Overlooked of 2018 Recess, Ian Potter Museum of Art, Gertrude Contemporary
    2018 #28 Shelley McSpedden Auto Body Works Arts Project Australia
    2018 #27 Rex Butler Colony: Australia 1770–1861 / Frontier Wars National Gallery of Victoria
    2018 #26 Paris Lettau Andrew Browne: Spill Tolarno Galleries
    2018 #25 Jane Eckett The Sculpture Park Point Leo Estate
    2018 #24 Giles Fielke Lucina Lane and Nigel Lendon: Teach the Kids to Strike Neon Parc
    2018 #23 Tim Alves I hope you get this: Raquel Ormella Shepparton Art Museum
    2018 #22 Chelsea Hopper Diane Arbus: American Portraits Heide Museum of Modern Art
    2018 #21 Rex Butler The Field Revisited National Gallery of Victoria
    2018 #20 Anna Parlane Hard Feelings The Honeymoon Suite
    2018 #19 Francis Plagne Abstraction 17: A Field of Interest, c. 1968 Charles Nodrum Gallery
    2018 #18 Eva Birch Kieren Seymour: Blue Blindness Block Projects
    2018 #17 Amelia Winata Natalie Thomas and the Women's Art Register: Finding the Field True Estate Gallery
    2018 #16 David Wlazlo Troy Ramaekers: Double B-Sides Five Walls Projects
    2018 #15 Helen Hughes Vivienne Binns: It is what it is, what it is Sutton Gallery
    2018 #14 Kate Warren Soda_Jerk: TERROR NULLIUS Australian Centre for the Moving Image
    2018 #13 Paris Lettau The Shape of Things to Come Buxton Contemporary
    2018 #12 Victoria Perin Unfinished Business: Perspectives on Art and Feminism Australian Centre for Contemporary Art
    2018 #11 Giles Fielke Samraing Chea: Universal Drawings Reading Room
    2018 #10 Nicholas Tammens Mutlu Çerkez: 1988-2065 Monash University Museum of Art
    2018 #09 Tiarney Miekus Genesis Breyer P-Orridge: Loyalty Does Not End With Death The SUBSTATION
    2018 #08 Anna Parlane Kirsten Lyttle: Digital Mana Centre for Contemporary Photography
    2018 #07 Francis Plagne Tony Clark: Chinoiserie Landscape 1987 - 2017 Murray White Room
    2018 #06 Rex Butler Richard Bell: Dredging up the Past Gertrude Contemporary
    2018 #05 Amelia Winata Kieran Butler and collaborators: Rainbow Bois and Magical Gurls Blindside
    2017 #52 Giles Fielke Triennial National Gallery of Victoria
    2017 #51 Victoria Perin Del Kathryn Barton: The Highway is a Disco National Gallery of Victoria
    2017 #50 Julia Lomas Angela Brennan: Forms of Life Ian Potter Museum of Art
    2017 #49 Kate Warren Cover Versions: Mimicry and Resistance Shepparton Art Museum
    2017 #48 Paris Lettau Our Knowing and Not Knowing: Helen Maudsley Ian Potter Centre: NGV Australia
    2017 #47 Francis Plagne Douglas Lance Gibson: What Was Once Yesterday Today & Tomorrow Tolarno Galleries
    2017 #46 Chelsea Hopper Jenny Watson: The Fabric of Fantasy Heide Museum of Modern Art
    2017 #45 Ian McLean Wayne Eager New Paintings Eastgate Gallery
    2017 #44 Anna Parlane Jason Phu: My Parents Met at the Fish Market Westspace
    2017 #43 Rex Butler Gareth Sansom: Transformer The Ian Potter Centre | NGV Australia
    2017 #42 David Wlazlo Joseph Kosuth: A Short History of My Thought Anna Schwartz Gallery
    2017 #41 Amelia Winata Darren Sylvester: Céline Bus Projects
    2017 #40 Helen Hughes Brent Harris: the small sword Tolarno Galleries
    2017 #39 Kate Warren The Score Ian Potter Museum of Art
    2017 #38 Paris Lettau Isadora Vaughan: Recalcitrant Bodies The Honeymoon Suite
    2017 #37 Francis Plagne Smallness: Trevelyan Clay & Kate Smith Neon Parc, Sutton Gallery
    2017 #36 Audrey Schmidt People Soup Suicidal Oil Piglet
    2017 #35 Anna Parlane Forever Transformed Gertrude Contemporary
    2017 #34 Jane Eckett Sidney Nolan and Elwyn Lynn: A Joint Centenary Charles Nodrum Gallery
    2017 #33 David Wlazlo Future Eaters Monash University Museum of Art
    2017 #32 Beth Kearney Fictitious Realities Bayside Arts and Cultural Centre
    2017 #31 Rex Butler Brave New World: Australia 1930s / Call of the Avant-Garde: Constructivism and Australian Art Heide Museum of Modern Art, Ian Potter Centre: NGV Australia
    2017 #30 Victoria Perin Discovering Dobell / Dobell’s Circle Tarrawarra Museum of Art
    2017 #29 Amelia Winata Spencer Lai: Contaminant, Figures Fort Delta
    2017 #28 Helen Hughes Liam Osborne: Hot Copy Punk Café
    2017 #27 Kylie King Dale Frank Neon Parc
    2017 #26 Francis Plagne Every Brilliant Eye National Gallery of Victoria
    2017 #25 Rex Butler I can see Russia from here TCB art inc.
    2017 #24 Kate Warren Andrea Grützner: Tanztee and Erbgericht Centre for Contemporary Photography
    2017 #23 Giles Fielke On Campus Monash University
    2017 #22 David Wlazlo Restless Margaret Lawrence Gallery
    2017 #21 Anna Parlane Sky Country: Our Connection to the Cosmos Blak Dot Gallery
    2017 #20 Amelia Winata Unproductive Thinking Deakin University Art Gallery
    2017 #19 Anthony White Van Gogh and the Seasons National Gallery of Victoria
    2017 #18 Victoria Perin Harold Freedman: Artist for the People Art Gallery of Ballarat
    2017 #17 Paris Lettau Raafat Ishak & Damiano Bertoli: Hebdomeros Sutton Gallery
    2017 #16 Beth Kearney Bill Henson National Gallery of Victoria
    2017 #15 Helen Hughes James Tylor: un-resettling Vivien Anderson Gallery
    2017 #14 Rex Butler Louise Hearman Tarrawarra Museum of Art
    2017 #13 Julia Lomas Sally Smart: The Choreography of Cutting Sarah Scout Presents
    2017 #12 Giles Fielke Open Spatial Workshop: Converging in Time Monash University Museum of Art
    2017 #11 Kate Warren Daniel Crooks: Parabolic / Miyanaga Akira: REALTIME Anna Schwartz Gallery, National Gallery of Victoria
    2017 #10 Francis Plagne David Hockney: Current National Gallery of Victoria
    2017 #09 David Wlazlo Project 17: Radical Immanence Anna Pappas Gallery
    2017 #08 Anna Parlane Stuart Ringholt: Works on Paper Neon Parc
    2017 #07 Victoria Perin Don't be too Polite: Posters and Activism Ian Potter Museum of Art
    2017 #06 Amelia Winata O’Keeffe, Preston, Cossington-Smith: Making Modernism Heide Museum of Modern Art
    2017 #05 Paris Lettau Sovereignty Australian Centre for Contemporary Art
    2017 #04 Beth Kearney Ramesh Nithiyendran: In the beginning Ian Potter Museum of Art
    2017 #03 Giles Fielke Lucina Lane: Range White Cuberd
    2017 #02 Helen Hughes The Sculpture of Bronwyn Oliver Tarrawarra Museum of Art
    2017 #01 Rex Butler Suzanne Archer: Moving Forwards, Looking Back: A Survey 1969–2016 Nicholas Thompson Gallery
    Jane Sutherland, Obstruction, Box Hill 1887
    Art Gallery of Ballarat
    by Rex Butler
    John Nixon, Groups + Pairs 2016-2020
    Anna Schwartz Gallery
    by Amelia Winata
    Justine Varga, Tachisme
    Tolarno Galleries
    by Chelsea Hopper
    Patrick Pound, The Museum of There, Not There
    STATION
    by Anna Parlane
    “Apparel”
    Neon Parc Brunswick
    by Kate Meakin
    Terre Thaemlitz, Love Bomb/Ai No Bakudan
    The SUBSTATION
    by Robert Schubert
    Lewis Fidock and Joshua Petherick, Weevils in the Flour
    Gertrude Contemporary
    by Philip Brophy
    Virginia Cuppaidge, The Skyspace Paintings 1977 - 1982
    Nicholas Thompson Gallery
    by Jane Eckett
    Callum Morton, Monument #32: Helter Shelter
    Alfred Deakin Place Ballarat
    by Rex Butler
    Ari Tampubolon, Symposia: This show is dedicated to K-pop girl group, TWICE. I love you.
    SEVENTH Gallery
    by Amelia Winata

    The End.