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  • Melbourne Art Fair & Spring 1883
    Australian Centre for Contemporary Art, Windsor Hotel
    02 Aug –
    04 Dec 2019
    By Victoria Perin, David Wlazlo, Amelia Winata
    03 Aug 2018

    Melbourne Art Fair & Spring 1883

    This week Memo Review travels through two art fairs currently open as part of Melbourne Art Week: David Wlazlo and Amelia Winata review the reborn Melbourne Art Fair at Southbank Arts Precinct, and Vicki Perin reviews the third Spring 1883 at The Hotel Windsor on Spring Street.


    Melbourne Art Fair

    Southbank Arts Precinct, 111 Sturt Street, Southbank, 2–5 August

    By David Wlazlo

    Maybe it isn’t the best way to approach it, but Melbourne Art Fair (MAF) seems to me an enormous and amorphous group show. Around fifty different galleries have presented some of their best work, and while it is pretty much impossible to do justice to each of these in a few hundred words, I’m going to make mention of a couple of trends or directions I noticed. In fact ‘direction’ is probably the best term, for the things that stood out to me are indeed directional, geographic and even cardinal. I’m picking these ideas out for myself, so please remind yourself this is just one particular interpretation.

    Cressida Campbell, Interior with Chinese Lantern (2018).

    A number of works in MAF suggest a kind of ‘axis of relation’ that traverses south to north or north to south. Starting perhaps in the elegant round woodcut of Cressida Campbell, Interior with Chinese Lantern (2018), an explicit chinoiserie emerges that is softly hinting toward a rethinking of regional relations, political and economic but also aesthetic. It is also possible to draw similar aesthetic and even exotic connotations from Alexander McKenzie’s painting Bird Sculptures (2018), a sumptuous rendering of an island garden in an idealised perspectival paddy field. The value of 19th-century cultural appropriation seems to be put to new use in an era that is beginning to echo the sentiments expressed by Paul Keating (so long ago) that the ‘far east’ is better thought of as the near north. Keating’s policies were as economic as they were cultural, suggesting a kind of ‘play toward the money’ that potentially carries through to the MAF. Aesthetics and the exotic seem to be intimately entwined, and more connections are made toward ‘the north’ throughout the show, seeming to culminate—mainly because it is at the dead end of the corridor of the Riding Hall Galleries—in Chiharu Shiota’s work, The Crossing (2018). This web-like installation of string and old books seems to hold pages in an aerial mycelium, a frozen moment of either explosion or implosion. And yet having been raised on a diet of intertextuality aeons ago, the work—while suggesting a fungal and biological beauty—seems to me to be held back by the loaded object that is ‘the book’.

    Michael Stevenson, MC510: Towards an Elective Clinical Peer Review (2018), in front of Displaced/Replaced Mass (ZZ top version) (1994).
    .)

    The second cardinal direction is east to west and west to east. The idea of trans-tasman relations is very strong at MAF, from the amazing work of Kirsten Lyttle to Michael Stevenson’s fascinating installation MC510: Towards an Elective Clinical Peer Review (2018). While Lyttle strongly reflects on her Māori heritage yet Australian location in I am not tangata whenua here (2018), Stevenson’s work draws on religious fundamentalism and osbcure Canadian churches involved in demonology, positioning the artist as a kind of citizen of the global archive. Both these possibilities are collapsed, however, in the powerfully critical video work of Cushla Donaldson. 501s (2018) shows a Hito Steyerl-esque digital rendering of a giant 17th century Venetian glass slipper overfilled with wine. The video alternately flashes with a Linux command line displaying SMSs sent by New Zealand citizens currently in off-shore detention thanks to the Australian Government’s immigration policy. These policies—spelled out in section 501 of the Migration Act 1958—allow deportation to occur based on perceived potential risk and vague assessments of ‘character’. Māori account for sixty percent of these deportations, and the message is clear: while we are all drowning in the luxurious consumption of an art fair, relations with our closest eastern neighbours are unusually strained.

    Gina Bundle, In Remembrance (2018).

    The work of Indigenous artists provides the strongest idea of a centre or pivot to these two directional axes. Karla Dickens’s series In the ’Hood (2017) presents head coverings printed and embroidered with various European iconography. Resembling balaclavas with drawstrings, these are the kinds of hood that might be used in torture, incarceration and their tragic crossover. Gina Bundle’s beautiful kangaroo skins, In Remembrance (2018), are my favourite works in the Fair. They combine patterns with repeated icons of black cockatoos and sting-rays bound by the shape of the skin, condensing the frame and the shape of representation so directly (if I were able to introduce Bundle’s work to Elizabeth Willing’s, I feel like they might have similar things to say). Dickens, Bundle and the work of many others bring the global connections back to work here. None more so than Ryan Presley’s Blood Money Currency Exchange Terminal (2018), which best sums up the relations between my hastily articulated directions around the compass. Presley’s installation is a mimicry of the ubiquitous currency exchange kiosk, except here we can change our dollars into blood money, literal polycarbonate notes that insert Indigenous material into our most treasured global system of value and exchange.

    The directions that I propose are reductive, I know: most artists are indeed akin to something like global citizens (Michael Stevenson and Chiharu Shiota are good examples). And yet I still think that, as in Presley’s exchange, perhaps we pay a price—a transfer fee—when we cross a frontier. Like Presley’s work, this fee operates within a complex and ever-changing system. And like MAF, there are always innumerable factors working within it to create a diverse and varied experience.

    David is a PhD Candidate in Art History and Theory at Monash University.


    Melbourne Art Fair

    By Amelia Winata

    After a four year absence and an enormous amount of PR surrounding its relaunch and rebrand, the Melbourne Art Fair had high expectations to live up to. Unfortunately, it feels like less thought was given to the main objective of the fair—sales—and how to achieve that. At its 2014 iteration (the last one prior to this) at the Royal Exhibition Building, patrons were treated to ceaseless drink and, when the main event finally wound down, were shepherded off to an after party in the CBD. It was pure hedonism. In stark contrast, Wednesday’s vernissage felt more like a music festival. Budget was a big consideration of this year’s festival, but asking people to pay $16 for a glass of wine and then forcing them to line up for eternity at an understaffed bar really did not feel conducive to a luxury art buying experience. Visitors were then ushered out promptly at 8pm.

    If these criticisms sound elitist, then perhaps it is because the thing that pulled people to the Melbourne Art Fair previously was the sense of elitism that it offered—that one might be wined and seduced into making a purchase. We would be lying to ourselves if we thought it was anything but. In any case, it is hard to come back with a bang when there is obvious budget concerns and Spring 1883, now in its third iteration and firmly established at the Windsor Hotel, is dishing out its very distinct tongue-in-cheek form of luxury close by in the CBD.

    Virginia Leonard, Pain Chart, Melbourne Art Fair, Courtesy PAULNACHE.

    The fair is staged across two locations—the newly refurbished stables at the VCA and an elaborate temporary structure in the ACCA forecourt (maybe that is where the budget went). One comical side effect of the temporary building is that the floor is quite unstable and with the large volume of visitors on opening night, many sculptural works swayed back and forth as though motorised. At Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery, Dale Frank’s massive stalagmite-like sculptures reached up to the ceiling and waved about like enormous rubber dildos. Indeed, this left the crowd bemused and with plenty of Instagram fodder, though I doubt artists would have been pleased with this unexpected outcome.

    Making an overall quality judgement about the work on display at an art fair is almost impossible: it is, after all, not a curated exhibition. Like all commercial fairs there were highs and lows. Not surprisingly, painting remains a low-risk crowd pleaser, with landscapes featuring heavily—Lucy Culliton at Jan Murphy Gallery, Alan Jones at Olsen Gallery, Travis McDonald at Niagara Galleries—some less ironically than others.

    James Tylor, Unsettling, Melbourne Art Fair, Courtesy Vivien Anderson Gallery.

    There are highlights, too. James Tylor’s offering at Vivien Anderson Gallery features works from his now well known Un-settling photographic series. Only here they have been beautifully installed across the entire length and height of one wall and interspersed with a number of ceremonial and quotidian tools. Meanwhile, New Zealand gallery PAULNACHE is exhibiting a series of gilded ceramic works from Virginia Leonard that, perched atop gold spindly plinths, are grotesque and over the top but simultaneously alluring for their extreme visceral qualities. The stalwart champion of Australian modernism—Charles Nodrum Gallery—is offering a small survey of works from Ron Robertson-Swann—the artist whose infamous yellow Vault sits in the ACCA forecourt. While I cannot say I have ever been a fan of that particular work, a series of more recent small framed pieces comprised of acrylic on canvas and/or polystyrene surprised. If nothing else, Melbourne Art Fair continues to represent an intergenerational cross section of galleries, though I can’t deny that free wine would make things a lot more fun.

    Amelia is a Melbourne-based arts writer and PhD candidate in Art History at the University of Melbourne.


    Sarah Scout Presents (Room 307).

    SPRING 1883

    The Hotel Windsor, 111 Spring Street, Melbourne, 1–4 August 2018

    By Vicki Perin

    If you’ve left it to the last day to see Spring 1883 well, tough tits: suck it up, wear only the most necessary items of clothes, do not bring a bag and start (as is the only way) from the top-level of the Windsor Hotel down:

    Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery (Room 428).

    Level Four
    Alaska Projects looked like a community bedding down together. It’s sometimes unpleasant to have to detangle the artists’ works from each other in these cramped luxury hotel suites. Alaska makes you feel like you don’t have to. A cohesive mix of textile (Raquel Caballero, Jason Phu and Kate Scardifield), and a bunch of other mixed medias leaning either towards painting (Tarik Ahlip, Jack Lanagan Dunbar) or sculpture. The mix was perfect for the Windsor as the hotel rewards texture and loves grit. I didn’t know how good I had it—up there on level four—it wasn’t until level one when I would find suites working this smoothly again.

    Neon Parc (Room 308).

    Level Three
    Arts Projects Australia was packed in the tradition of a treasure-hunt. One of the best suites for sculpture, like Adrian Lazzaro, and drawings, like Rebecca Scibilia. You’re going to miss pieces but check the cupboard and the bathroom for Chris Mason’s painted-snakeskin snakes. I also appreciated Sutton Gallery’s solo presentation of Laresa Kosloff’s video and photo-works, which were just weird enough.

    Kalli Rolfe Contemporary Art (Room 207).

    Level Two
    Kalli Rolfe Contemporary Art had some hits and misses, as did most of the big galleries who need to squeeze their Big Gallery Art into ad hoc spaces. Ben McKeown’s head studies looked beautiful. Somehow the works of Juan Davilla, Anne Wallace and Nikos Pantazopoulos didn’t fight with each other; despite being so different, all three looked strong.

    Mars Gallery (Room 106).

    Level One
    Bless you, Level One. Bless Negative Press for making great prints with no compromises: see Brook Andrew, Elizabeth Newman, Emily Ferretti, John Spiteri, Brent Harris, all printed in collaboration with Trent Walter. A solo suite at Michael Bugelli Gallery sees Heather B. Swann completely dominate the scale she’s been given. The room is so well-handled, it makes you wonder why everyone else finds it so hard to create a distinct mood at the Windsor. The Project Room, a non-gallery suite specially curated by Madé Spencer-Castle and Jeremy Eaton, was also able set a tone in their femme inspired, floral-themed group show. The ideal presentation for many of the works selected. Many highlights.

    Third Drawer Down (Room 107).

    BONUS: Best Bathrooms and one-offs
    The bathroom display, a special room. Always looked forward to, but seemingly hard to pull-off: I’d squeeze again into Lou Hubbard at Sarah Scout Presents (Level Four), Peter Atkins at GAGPROJECTS (Level One), and I’d dodge the heavy selfie-trade in The Project Room for Heidi Holmes' unclean soap miniatures.
    A list of individual highlights: Daniel Noonan at Dutton, Alex Pittendrigh’s gummy sculpture in Murray White Room, two neighbouring pieces at Caves by Noriko Nakamura and Pia Murphy, Richard Lewer from Suite, and the solo show of Sam Thomas at Bowerbank Ninow, as the New Zealand gallery shows us all how to best handle the Windsor’s no nails policy.

    Victoria is commencing her PhD at the University of Melbourne. Her research concerns printmaking in Melbourne during the 1960s, 70s and 80s. In 2013, she was the Gordon Darling Intern in the Australian Prints and Drawings Department at the National Gallery of Australia.

    Title image: Ryan Presley, Blood Money Currency Exchange Terminal (2018).)


    2020 #14 Jane Eckett Virginia Cuppaidge, The Skyspace Paintings 1977 - 1982 Nicholas Thompson Gallery
    2020 #13 Rex Butler Callum Morton, Monument #32: Helter Shelter Alfred Deakin Place Ballarat
    2020 #12 Amelia Winata Ari Tampubolon, Symposia: This show is dedicated to K-pop girl group, TWICE. I love you. SEVENTH Gallery
    2020 #11 Giles Fielke Warwick Baker, Hi-Vis Dreams Centre for Contemporary Photography
    2020 #10 Amelia Wallin Agatha Gothe-Snape, The Outcome is Certain Monash University Museum of Art
    2020 #09 Audrey Schmidt Alethea Everard, Art show Meow2
    2020 #08 Chelsea Hopper Elizabeth Gower, LOCATIONS Sutton Gallery, Sutton Projects
    2020 #07 Paris Lettau KAWS: Companionship in the Age of Loneliness NGV International
    2020 #06 Victoria Perin Assembled: The Art of Robert Klippel Tarrawarra Museum of Art
    2019 #51 Luke Smythe Colin McCahon: Letters and Numbers National Gallery of Victoria
    2019 #50 David Wlazlo 110%: Wet Nurse c3 Contemporary Art Space
    2019 #49 Helen O'Toole Luke Sands Guzzler
    2019 #48 David Homewood Robert Hunter Ian Potter Centre: NGV Australia
    2019 #47 Giles Fielke Kate Wallace, Views to Remember / Travis McDonald, Clock Face C3 Contemporary Art Space
    2019 #46 Audrey Schmidt In Costume Mejia
    2019 #45 Marnie Edmiston Collection leads: John Scurry—small paintings Geelong Gallery
    2019 #44 Rex Butler Collecting Comme National Gallery of Victoria
    2019 #43 Francis Plagne Elizabeth Newman Neon Parc City
    2019 #42 Amelia Winata Preparation Haydens
    2019 #41 Victoria Perin Never the same river Anna Schwartz Gallery
    2019 #40 Philip Brophy Haroon Mirza: The Construction of an Act Australian Centre for Contemporary Art
    2019 #39 Matthew Linde Balenciaga: Shaping Fashion Bendigo Art Gallery
    2019 #38 Maddee Clark Fiona Foley: Who are these strangers and where are they going? Ballarat International Foto Biennale
    2019 #37 Giles Fielke Karrabing Film Collective: The Mermaids, or Aiden in Wonderland KINGS Artist Run
    2019 #36 Aneta Trajkoski SERIAL McClelland Sculpture Park+Gallery
    2019 #34 Philip Brophy ...(illegible)... MADA Gallery
    2019 #32 Ella Cattach On Vulnerability and Doubt Australian Centre for Contemporary Art
    2019 #31 Helen O'Toole George Egerton-Warburton, also known as , Heide Museum of Modern Art
    2019 #30 Victoria Perin, Brendan Casey I will never run out of lies nor love Bus Projects
    2019 #29 Anna Parlane FEM-aFFINITY Arts Project Australia
    2019 #28 Jane Eckett Josef Stanislaw Ostoja-Kotkowski: Solid Light McClelland Sculpture Park+Gallery
    2019 #27 Elyssia Bugg Prima Materia Bundoora Homestead
    2019 #26 Amelia Winata Angelica Mesiti: ASSEMBLY Venice Biennale
    2019 #25 Rex Butler Hans and Nora Heysen: Two Generations of Australian Art Ian Potter Centre: NGV Australia
    2019 #24 Francis Plagne Janet Burchill and Jennifer McCamley: Temptation to Co-exist Heide Museum of Modern Art
    2019 #23 Audrey Schmidt Octopus 19: Ventriloquy Gertrude Contemporary
    2019 #22 Anna Parlane Serene Velocity in Practice: MC510/CS183 Monash University Museum of Art
    2019 #21 Sophie Knezic Arlo Mountford: Deep Revolt Shepparton Art Museum
    2019 #21 Philip Brophy Christian Thompson: Baya Gardiya Australian Centre for the Moving Image
    2019 #20 Victoria Perin Isabel Davies: Recent Geometric Constructions Stephen McLaughlan Gallery
    2019 #19 Chelsea Hopper Taryn Simon: Contraband Anna Schwartz Gallery
    2019 #18 Rex Butler Tracey Moffatt: Body Remembers Tarrawarra Museum of Art
    2019 #17 Stephen Palmer Amalia Lindo: Computer Shoulders Centre for Contemporary Photography
    2019 #16 Giles Fielke Carve A Future, Devour Everything, Become Something Ian Potter Centre: NGV Australia
    2019 #15 David Wlazlo Compromise Warrnambool Art Gallery
    2019 #14 Ella Cattach Emma Phillips: Too Much to Dream Reading Room
    2019 #13 Paris Lettau The Museological Consciousness Lyon Housemuseum Galleries, Meow
    2019 #13 The Editors Memo Review 01. Perimeter Books, World Food Books, Monash University Museum of Art
    2019 #12 Giles Fielke Tudors to Windsors: British Royal Portraits Bendigo Art Gallery
    2019 #11 Sophie Knezic The Tennis Piece Gertrude Contemporary
    2019 #10 Victoria Perin Papermade / John Nixon: Screenprints, Woodblocks & Unique Relief Prints Negative Press, Australian Galleries
    2019 #09 Francis Plagne Visions of Paradise: Indian Court Paintings National Gallery of Victoria
    2019 #08 Amelia Winata Daniel von Sturmer Anna Schwartz Gallery
    2019 #07 Audrey Schmidt Carny Neon Parc
    2019 #06 Rex Butler Christian Marclay: The Clock Australian Centre for the Moving Image
    2019 #05 Anna Parlane Marlene Gilson Art Gallery of Ballarat
    2018 #52 Memo Review Thanks for reading in 2018
    2018 #51 Victoria Perin Sweeney Reed and Strines Gallery Heide Museum of Modern Art
    2018 #50 Paris Lettau Katie West: warna (ground) Caves
    2018 #49 Audrey Schmidt Aesthetics, Politics and Histories: The Social Context of Art AAANZ Conference 2018 - RMIT University
    2018 #49 The Editors Does the art exhibition have a future? AAANZ Conference 2018 - RMIT University
    2018 #48 Rex Butler Mira Gojak and Takehito Koganezawa: The Garden of Forking Paths Buxton Contemporary
    2018 #47 Jane Eckett Clement Meadmore: The art of mid-century design Ian Potter Museum of Art
    2018 #46 Francis Plagne Spencer Lai: A smile forms into a grimace / Matilda Davis: Too Many Dinner Parties Bus Projects
    2018 #45 Anna Parlane Lili Reynaud-Dewar, TEETH, GUMS, MACHINES, FUTURE, SOCIETY / Alicia Frankovich, Exoplanets Monash University Museum of Art
    2018 #44 Amelia Winata Hito Steyerl: Factory of the Sun National Gallery of Victoria
    2018 #43 David Wlazlo Biennale of Australian Art Art Gallery of Ballarat
    2018 #42 Giles Fielke Anne Ferran: White Against Red Sutton Gallery
    2018 #41 Sophie Knezic Eavesdropping Ian Potter Museum of Art
    2018 #41 Benison Kilby State of the Union Ian Potter Museum of Art
    2018 #40 Tim Alves John Stezaker: Lost World Centre for Contemporary Photography
    2018 #39 Paris Lettau Brook Andrew: The Language of Skulls Ten Cubed
    2018 #38 Jane Eckett Design for Life: Grant and Mary Featherston Heide Museum of Modern Art
    2018 #37 Rex Butler Tom Roberts: Shearing the Rams National Gallery of Victoria
    2018 #36 Victoria Perin Baldessin / Whiteley: Parallel Visions National Gallery of Victoria
    2018 #35 Hester Lyon Architecture Makes Us: Cinematic Visions of Sonia Leber and David Chesworth Centre for Contemporary Photography
    2018 #34 Francis Plagne Robert Smithson: Time Crystals Monash University Museum of Art
    2018 #34 Philip Brophy Robert Smithson: Time Crystals Monash University Museum of Art
    2018 #33 Amelia Winata Nicholas Mangan, Termite Economies Sutton Gallery
    2018 #32 Giles Fielke Philadelphia Wireman World Food Books
    2018 #31 Victoria Perin, David Wlazlo, Amelia Winata Melbourne Art Fair & Spring 1883 Australian Centre for Contemporary Art, Windsor Hotel
    2018 #30 Anna Parlane A Lightness of Spirit is the Measure of Happiness Australian Centre for Contemporary Art
    2018 #29 Giles Fielke, Amelia Winata, Tiarney Miekus Best and Overlooked of 2018 Recess, Ian Potter Museum of Art, Gertrude Contemporary
    2018 #28 Shelley McSpedden Auto Body Works Arts Project Australia
    2018 #27 Rex Butler Colony: Australia 1770–1861 / Frontier Wars National Gallery of Victoria
    2018 #26 Paris Lettau Andrew Browne: Spill Tolarno Galleries
    2018 #25 Jane Eckett The Sculpture Park Point Leo Estate
    2018 #24 Giles Fielke Lucina Lane and Nigel Lendon: Teach the Kids to Strike Neon Parc
    2018 #23 Tim Alves I hope you get this: Raquel Ormella Shepparton Art Museum
    2018 #22 Chelsea Hopper Diane Arbus: American Portraits Heide Museum of Modern Art
    2018 #21 Rex Butler The Field Revisited National Gallery of Victoria
    2018 #20 Anna Parlane Hard Feelings The Honeymoon Suite
    2018 #19 Francis Plagne Abstraction 17: A Field of Interest, c. 1968 Charles Nodrum Gallery
    2018 #18 Eva Birch Kieren Seymour: Blue Blindness Block Projects
    2018 #17 Amelia Winata Natalie Thomas and the Women's Art Register: Finding the Field True Estate Gallery
    2018 #16 David Wlazlo Troy Ramaekers: Double B-Sides Five Walls Projects
    2018 #15 Helen Hughes Vivienne Binns: It is what it is, what it is Sutton Gallery
    2018 #14 Kate Warren Soda_Jerk: TERROR NULLIUS Australian Centre for the Moving Image
    2018 #13 Paris Lettau The Shape of Things to Come Buxton Contemporary
    2018 #12 Victoria Perin Unfinished Business: Perspectives on Art and Feminism Australian Centre for Contemporary Art
    2018 #11 Giles Fielke Samraing Chea: Universal Drawings Reading Room
    2018 #10 Nicholas Tammens Mutlu Çerkez: 1988-2065 Monash University Museum of Art
    2018 #09 Tiarney Miekus Genesis Breyer P-Orridge: Loyalty Does Not End With Death The SUBSTATION
    2018 #08 Anna Parlane Kirsten Lyttle: Digital Mana Centre for Contemporary Photography
    2018 #07 Francis Plagne Tony Clark: Chinoiserie Landscape 1987 - 2017 Murray White Room
    2018 #06 Rex Butler Richard Bell: Dredging up the Past Gertrude Contemporary
    2018 #05 Amelia Winata Kieran Butler and collaborators: Rainbow Bois and Magical Gurls Blindside
    2017 #52 Giles Fielke Triennial National Gallery of Victoria
    2017 #51 Victoria Perin Del Kathryn Barton: The Highway is a Disco National Gallery of Victoria
    2017 #50 Julia Lomas Angela Brennan: Forms of Life Ian Potter Museum of Art
    2017 #49 Kate Warren Cover Versions: Mimicry and Resistance Shepparton Art Museum
    2017 #48 Paris Lettau Our Knowing and Not Knowing: Helen Maudsley Ian Potter Centre: NGV Australia
    2017 #47 Francis Plagne Douglas Lance Gibson: What Was Once Yesterday Today & Tomorrow Tolarno Galleries
    2017 #46 Chelsea Hopper Jenny Watson: The Fabric of Fantasy Heide Museum of Modern Art
    2017 #45 Ian McLean Wayne Eager New Paintings Eastgate Gallery
    2017 #44 Anna Parlane Jason Phu: My Parents Met at the Fish Market Westspace
    2017 #43 Rex Butler Gareth Sansom: Transformer The Ian Potter Centre | NGV Australia
    2017 #42 David Wlazlo Joseph Kosuth: A Short History of My Thought Anna Schwartz Gallery
    2017 #41 Amelia Winata Darren Sylvester: Céline Bus Projects
    2017 #40 Helen Hughes Brent Harris: the small sword Tolarno Galleries
    2017 #39 Kate Warren The Score Ian Potter Museum of Art
    2017 #38 Paris Lettau Isadora Vaughan: Recalcitrant Bodies The Honeymoon Suite
    2017 #37 Francis Plagne Smallness: Trevelyan Clay & Kate Smith Neon Parc, Sutton Gallery
    2017 #36 Audrey Schmidt People Soup Suicidal Oil Piglet
    2017 #35 Anna Parlane Forever Transformed Gertrude Contemporary
    2017 #34 Jane Eckett Sidney Nolan and Elwyn Lynn: A Joint Centenary Charles Nodrum Gallery
    2017 #33 David Wlazlo Future Eaters Monash University Museum of Art
    2017 #32 Beth Kearney Fictitious Realities Bayside Arts and Cultural Centre
    2017 #31 Rex Butler Brave New World: Australia 1930s / Call of the Avant-Garde: Constructivism and Australian Art Heide Museum of Modern Art, Ian Potter Centre: NGV Australia
    2017 #30 Victoria Perin Discovering Dobell / Dobell’s Circle Tarrawarra Museum of Art
    2017 #29 Amelia Winata Spencer Lai: Contaminant, Figures Fort Delta
    2017 #28 Helen Hughes Liam Osborne: Hot Copy Punk Café
    2017 #27 Kylie King Dale Frank Neon Parc
    2017 #26 Francis Plagne Every Brilliant Eye National Gallery of Victoria
    2017 #25 Rex Butler I can see Russia from here TCB art inc.
    2017 #24 Kate Warren Andrea Grützner: Tanztee and Erbgericht Centre for Contemporary Photography
    2017 #23 Giles Fielke On Campus Monash University
    2017 #22 David Wlazlo Restless Margaret Lawrence Gallery
    2017 #21 Anna Parlane Sky Country: Our Connection to the Cosmos Blak Dot Gallery
    2017 #20 Amelia Winata Unproductive Thinking Deakin University Art Gallery
    2017 #19 Anthony White Van Gogh and the Seasons National Gallery of Victoria
    2017 #18 Victoria Perin Harold Freedman: Artist for the People Art Gallery of Ballarat
    2017 #17 Paris Lettau Raafat Ishak & Damiano Bertoli: Hebdomeros Sutton Gallery
    2017 #16 Beth Kearney Bill Henson National Gallery of Victoria
    2017 #15 Helen Hughes James Tylor: un-resettling Vivien Anderson Gallery
    2017 #14 Rex Butler Louise Hearman Tarrawarra Museum of Art
    2017 #13 Julia Lomas Sally Smart: The Choreography of Cutting Sarah Scout Presents
    2017 #12 Giles Fielke Open Spatial Workshop: Converging in Time Monash University Museum of Art
    2017 #11 Kate Warren Daniel Crooks: Parabolic / Miyanaga Akira: REALTIME Anna Schwartz Gallery, National Gallery of Victoria
    2017 #10 Francis Plagne David Hockney: Current National Gallery of Victoria
    2017 #09 David Wlazlo Project 17: Radical Immanence Anna Pappas Gallery
    2017 #08 Anna Parlane Stuart Ringholt: Works on Paper Neon Parc
    2017 #07 Victoria Perin Don't be too Polite: Posters and Activism Ian Potter Museum of Art
    2017 #06 Amelia Winata O’Keeffe, Preston, Cossington-Smith: Making Modernism Heide Museum of Modern Art
    2017 #05 Paris Lettau Sovereignty Australian Centre for Contemporary Art
    2017 #04 Beth Kearney Ramesh Nithiyendran: In the beginning Ian Potter Museum of Art
    2017 #03 Giles Fielke Lucina Lane: Range White Cuberd
    2017 #02 Helen Hughes The Sculpture of Bronwyn Oliver Tarrawarra Museum of Art
    2017 #01 Rex Butler Suzanne Archer: Moving Forwards, Looking Back: A Survey 1969–2016 Nicholas Thompson Gallery
    Virginia Cuppaidge, The Skyspace Paintings 1977 - 1982
    Nicholas Thompson Gallery
    by Jane Eckett
    Callum Morton, Monument #32: Helter Shelter
    Alfred Deakin Place Ballarat
    by Rex Butler
    Ari Tampubolon, Symposia: This show is dedicated to K-pop girl group, TWICE. I love you.
    SEVENTH Gallery
    by Amelia Winata
    Warwick Baker, Hi-Vis Dreams
    Centre for Contemporary Photography
    by Giles Fielke
    Agatha Gothe-Snape, The Outcome is Certain
    Monash University Museum of Art
    by Amelia Wallin
    Alethea Everard, Art show
    Meow2
    by Audrey Schmidt
    Elizabeth Gower, LOCATIONS
    Sutton Gallery, Sutton Projects
    by Chelsea Hopper
    KAWS: Companionship in the Age of Loneliness
    NGV International
    by Paris Lettau
    Assembled: The Art of Robert Klippel
    Tarrawarra Museum of Art
    by Victoria Perin
    Colin McCahon: Letters and Numbers
    National Gallery of Victoria
    by Luke Smythe

    The End.