Memo Review is committed to continuing our weekly reviews where possible throughout the current period.

We encourage readers to send us details of shows that are online or installed in closed galleries for possible review.
editor@memoreview.net

  • Emma Phillips: Too Much to Dream
    Reading Room
    13 Mar –
    27 Apr 2019
    By Ella Cattach
    06 Apr 2019

    There are three Dianes—two portrait subjects, one spectre—in Emma Phillips' current exhibition of large-scale, predominantly black-and-white photographs which takes its title, Too much to dream, from a song by The Electric Prunes.

    The first Diane, of Untitled (Diane washing dishes at her father's house) and the unfocussed, tightly cropped colour triptych Untitled (Diane on her bed, smiling), both 2018, previously appeared in a key portrait from the artist's 2017 exhibition at CAVES titled Greetings. There, in Untitled (Diane with pet rat), 2016, Diane gazed affectionately, knowingly, at the pet rat clinging to her shoulder. "do you miss the rats?" reads a line from Phillips' intriguing bricolage text, which accompanies Too Much to Dream and is composed of "diary notes and sentences friends, family and portrait subjects' have written, texted or spoken aloud, as well as excerpts from Clarice Lispector's A Breath of life." We might imagine that Diane, while washing dishes at her father's house, flanked by neat rows of baby bottles to her right and a tin of baby formula to her left, replies without turning that she's too busy to miss the rats.

    Emma Phillips, Too much to dream, installation view at ReadingRoom. Photo: Andrew Curtis.

    The second Diane appears in Untitled (Denise and Diane twinning) (2018), though it is difficult to tell which of its two women she is. Their likeness, which we are commanded to look for by the parenthetical non-title, is obscured by the way they are posed together, dressed similarly but not identically. The women—one sitting in an armchair, the other balancing on the chair's arm—press their foreheads together, so we can see just a sliver of one's profile between the parted curtains of their separate-yet-together heads of hair. If they are twins, we can't tell; their likeness is seductively suppressed by their pose. Atop the cabinet behind them are several kitsch sets of twin figurines posing just as cutely among family photos. The delirium of seeing double, or triple, as in the hazy triptych of the first Diane, floods across the exhibition: "hallucinations hallucinations hallucinations," goes a line from Phillips' text collage, which is full of dreams and of madness (the madman is a waking dreamer, said Schopenhauer).

    Emma Phillips, Untitled (Denise and Diane twinning), 2018. Courtesy the artist and ReadingRoom, Melbourne.

    Twinning cues the third Diane: Diane Arbus, whose influence is most legible in the outlier photograph of the exhibition, Untitled (muscleman), 2018, calling up in both subject and composition Arbus' Muscle man in his dressing room with trophy, Brooklyn, N. Y. 1962. Phillips' muscleman occupies curious territory, almost prohibitively placed on the back wall of the gallery's office, where he is visible, awkwardly, from Room One of the gallery space through the office's doorway. His distance from the rest of the exhibition deepens his distance within the photograph from the camera. In all his bronzed muscular robustness (rewarded only with a medal around his neck, unlike Arbus' proud trophy bearer), he appears comically small as if foreshortened—a caricature of masculinity at the fringe of Phillips' vision, and the only man depicted in this collection of her work. His isolation was no more evident than on the exhibition's opening night, during which the door to the office was, for stretches of time, closed, so that diligent punters abiding by the dictates of their room sheets asked permission to enter the office and see him.

    Emma Phillips, Untitled (muscleman), 2018. Courtesy the artist and ReadingRoom, Melbourne.

    The third Diane is also gestured to in Phillips' striking photograph of an albino teenage girl. Untitled (Lucy at Sammy's house), 2018, evokes Arbus' photographs of a young female albino sword swallower in Albino sword swallower at a carnival, Md. 1970 and Albino sword swallower and her sister, Hagerstown, MD., 1970. That the albino girl in Phillips' photograph is one of two—like the sword swallower whose sister is albino—is hinted at in its non-title. Lucy and Sammy are a teenaged albino duo with a public profile. As news.com.au reported in 2017, "Two Geelong girls with albinism have started an Instagram fashion account and it's taking off." The portrait of Lucy is distinct from the other portraits in the exhibition in that we can see the subject's face clearly. Its sharpness is made sharper by the fact that she is blind; the one we can see can't see us. She gazes through us, as if into herself, while we examine the pure white strands of her eyelashes and hair.

    Emma Phillips, Untitled (Lucy at Sammy's house), 2018. Courtesy the artist and ReadingRoom, Melbourne.

    In Greetings, Phillips photographed her subjects outside on the street. Now, she has entered their homes. The first Diane is not the lone returning cast member. The young woman in the portrait nearest to that of Lucy—Untitled (Amber on her grandmother's bed), 2018—appeared in the earlier exhibition's Untitled (Amber in leopard print), 2016, striking a pose—hand almost on hip—in a leopard print jacket over matched but mismatched leopard print tights. The progression from the tiny inkjet print portraits in Greetings to the large-scale gelatin silver and chromogenic prints in Too Much to Dream is startling, not least because of the radical shift in scale. The blurriness of Diane and Amber's faces in the new photographs is also suggestive of a new intimacy between photographer and subject—reinforced by the fact that both are pictured on beds. This intimacy, we imagine, has been cultivated since Phillips' earlier show, where the impassive formality of the title Greetings suggested first meetings.

    The portraits of Lucy and Amber are separated by a stunning shot of a tree—Untitled (pollarded tree), 2018—with its limbs cut off, raw and disfigured. Together with and on either side of the tree, the vulnerability of Phillips' portrait subjects is so apparent. Vulnerability is a convincingly essential aspect of her work, and it sits strangely. Arbus confided to a friend that photographing people could be compared to "flattening them on the wall like a butterfly impaled on a pin." The landscapes and still lifes in Too much to dream—which include an outstretched arm of a butterfly hanging mobile in Untitled (butterflies), 2018—sit on the same plane as Phillips' portraits. They are presented in the same way, at the same scale. How are we to read the whiteness of the unglowing glow-in-the-dark stars and butterflies on a white ceiling in Untitled (synthetic stars), 2018? As an aesthetic complement to the portrait of the albino girl?

    Emma Phillips, Too much to dream, installation view at ReadingRoom. Photo: Andrew Curtis.

    By invoking the confessional, Phillips' text can be read as a counteroffer, wherein which she exposes her own vulnerability. The text makes claims for candour: "this isn't a narrative, it's a primary life that breathes breathes breathes" and "i am always sincere." The latter statement is naturally subject to the paradox of the Cretan liar—a fact it draws attention to on the second page of the text with reference to "the great pretender." The authorial indeterminacy of the text's fragments invites decoding and plays against the transparency of the confessional. It also offers meditations on the fraught relationship between photographer and subject. We might comfortably attribute lines such as "still haven't found a way to photograph people" and "I introduce you to myself, visualise you in snapshots" to the photographer, and reckon that the question mark-less question "is your camera heavy," is an utterance of one of her subjects. The seduction that takes place between photographer and subject is a curious one. The photographer seduces the subject, but the subject is seduced by their own image: "I would love to get into modelling sometime next year, or even learn guitar" is another line we can imagine attributed to one of the young women photographed. The artist's textual display of vulnerability may not be equivalent to that of her portrait subjects, but it serves to show that just as they are in her text, she is in their photographs.

    I have been calling, not without some unease, Phillips' portrait subjects by their real names, while also treating them like characters in a novel. In A Breath of life, Clarice Lispector struggles, as Arbus does, to be compassionate to her characters: "I live in the living flesh, that's why I make such an effort to give thick skin to my characters. But I can't stand it and make them cry for no reason." Phillips' portraits are vastly gentler, and tenderer, than Arbus'. But ambivalence dictates that there is always a measure of hate in love, and violence in tenderness.

    Can a woman in a photograph take on an unreality and become fiction? When I dream about someone real, is it them or is it me? Too real is this make-believe.

    Ella Cattach is a Melbourne-based writer.

    Title image: Emma Phillips, Untitled (Diane washing dishes at her father's house), 2018. Courtesy the artist and ReadingRoom, Melbourne.)


    2020 #14 Jane Eckett Virginia Cuppaidge, The Skyspace Paintings 1977 - 1982 Nicholas Thompson Gallery
    2020 #13 Rex Butler Callum Morton, Monument #32: Helter Shelter Alfred Deakin Place Ballarat
    2020 #12 Amelia Winata Ari Tampubolon, Symposia: This show is dedicated to K-pop girl group, TWICE. I love you. SEVENTH Gallery
    2020 #11 Giles Fielke Warwick Baker, Hi-Vis Dreams Centre for Contemporary Photography
    2020 #10 Amelia Wallin Agatha Gothe-Snape, The Outcome is Certain Monash University Museum of Art
    2020 #09 Audrey Schmidt Alethea Everard, Art show Meow2
    2020 #08 Chelsea Hopper Elizabeth Gower, LOCATIONS Sutton Gallery, Sutton Projects
    2020 #07 Paris Lettau KAWS: Companionship in the Age of Loneliness NGV International
    2020 #06 Victoria Perin Assembled: The Art of Robert Klippel Tarrawarra Museum of Art
    2019 #51 Luke Smythe Colin McCahon: Letters and Numbers National Gallery of Victoria
    2019 #50 David Wlazlo 110%: Wet Nurse c3 Contemporary Art Space
    2019 #49 Helen O'Toole Luke Sands Guzzler
    2019 #48 David Homewood Robert Hunter Ian Potter Centre: NGV Australia
    2019 #47 Giles Fielke Kate Wallace, Views to Remember / Travis McDonald, Clock Face C3 Contemporary Art Space
    2019 #46 Audrey Schmidt In Costume Mejia
    2019 #45 Marnie Edmiston Collection leads: John Scurry—small paintings Geelong Gallery
    2019 #44 Rex Butler Collecting Comme National Gallery of Victoria
    2019 #43 Francis Plagne Elizabeth Newman Neon Parc City
    2019 #42 Amelia Winata Preparation Haydens
    2019 #41 Victoria Perin Never the same river Anna Schwartz Gallery
    2019 #40 Philip Brophy Haroon Mirza: The Construction of an Act Australian Centre for Contemporary Art
    2019 #39 Matthew Linde Balenciaga: Shaping Fashion Bendigo Art Gallery
    2019 #38 Maddee Clark Fiona Foley: Who are these strangers and where are they going? Ballarat International Foto Biennale
    2019 #37 Giles Fielke Karrabing Film Collective: The Mermaids, or Aiden in Wonderland KINGS Artist Run
    2019 #36 Aneta Trajkoski SERIAL McClelland Sculpture Park+Gallery
    2019 #34 Philip Brophy ...(illegible)... MADA Gallery
    2019 #32 Ella Cattach On Vulnerability and Doubt Australian Centre for Contemporary Art
    2019 #31 Helen O'Toole George Egerton-Warburton, also known as , Heide Museum of Modern Art
    2019 #30 Victoria Perin, Brendan Casey I will never run out of lies nor love Bus Projects
    2019 #29 Anna Parlane FEM-aFFINITY Arts Project Australia
    2019 #28 Jane Eckett Josef Stanislaw Ostoja-Kotkowski: Solid Light McClelland Sculpture Park+Gallery
    2019 #27 Elyssia Bugg Prima Materia Bundoora Homestead
    2019 #26 Amelia Winata Angelica Mesiti: ASSEMBLY Venice Biennale
    2019 #25 Rex Butler Hans and Nora Heysen: Two Generations of Australian Art Ian Potter Centre: NGV Australia
    2019 #24 Francis Plagne Janet Burchill and Jennifer McCamley: Temptation to Co-exist Heide Museum of Modern Art
    2019 #23 Audrey Schmidt Octopus 19: Ventriloquy Gertrude Contemporary
    2019 #22 Anna Parlane Serene Velocity in Practice: MC510/CS183 Monash University Museum of Art
    2019 #21 Sophie Knezic Arlo Mountford: Deep Revolt Shepparton Art Museum
    2019 #21 Philip Brophy Christian Thompson: Baya Gardiya Australian Centre for the Moving Image
    2019 #20 Victoria Perin Isabel Davies: Recent Geometric Constructions Stephen McLaughlan Gallery
    2019 #19 Chelsea Hopper Taryn Simon: Contraband Anna Schwartz Gallery
    2019 #18 Rex Butler Tracey Moffatt: Body Remembers Tarrawarra Museum of Art
    2019 #17 Stephen Palmer Amalia Lindo: Computer Shoulders Centre for Contemporary Photography
    2019 #16 Giles Fielke Carve A Future, Devour Everything, Become Something Ian Potter Centre: NGV Australia
    2019 #15 David Wlazlo Compromise Warrnambool Art Gallery
    2019 #14 Ella Cattach Emma Phillips: Too Much to Dream Reading Room
    2019 #13 Paris Lettau The Museological Consciousness Lyon Housemuseum Galleries, Meow
    2019 #13 The Editors Memo Review 01. Perimeter Books, World Food Books, Monash University Museum of Art
    2019 #12 Giles Fielke Tudors to Windsors: British Royal Portraits Bendigo Art Gallery
    2019 #11 Sophie Knezic The Tennis Piece Gertrude Contemporary
    2019 #10 Victoria Perin Papermade / John Nixon: Screenprints, Woodblocks & Unique Relief Prints Negative Press, Australian Galleries
    2019 #09 Francis Plagne Visions of Paradise: Indian Court Paintings National Gallery of Victoria
    2019 #08 Amelia Winata Daniel von Sturmer Anna Schwartz Gallery
    2019 #07 Audrey Schmidt Carny Neon Parc
    2019 #06 Rex Butler Christian Marclay: The Clock Australian Centre for the Moving Image
    2019 #05 Anna Parlane Marlene Gilson Art Gallery of Ballarat
    2018 #52 Memo Review Thanks for reading in 2018
    2018 #51 Victoria Perin Sweeney Reed and Strines Gallery Heide Museum of Modern Art
    2018 #50 Paris Lettau Katie West: warna (ground) Caves
    2018 #49 Audrey Schmidt Aesthetics, Politics and Histories: The Social Context of Art AAANZ Conference 2018 - RMIT University
    2018 #49 The Editors Does the art exhibition have a future? AAANZ Conference 2018 - RMIT University
    2018 #48 Rex Butler Mira Gojak and Takehito Koganezawa: The Garden of Forking Paths Buxton Contemporary
    2018 #47 Jane Eckett Clement Meadmore: The art of mid-century design Ian Potter Museum of Art
    2018 #46 Francis Plagne Spencer Lai: A smile forms into a grimace / Matilda Davis: Too Many Dinner Parties Bus Projects
    2018 #45 Anna Parlane Lili Reynaud-Dewar, TEETH, GUMS, MACHINES, FUTURE, SOCIETY / Alicia Frankovich, Exoplanets Monash University Museum of Art
    2018 #44 Amelia Winata Hito Steyerl: Factory of the Sun National Gallery of Victoria
    2018 #43 David Wlazlo Biennale of Australian Art Art Gallery of Ballarat
    2018 #42 Giles Fielke Anne Ferran: White Against Red Sutton Gallery
    2018 #41 Sophie Knezic Eavesdropping Ian Potter Museum of Art
    2018 #41 Benison Kilby State of the Union Ian Potter Museum of Art
    2018 #40 Tim Alves John Stezaker: Lost World Centre for Contemporary Photography
    2018 #39 Paris Lettau Brook Andrew: The Language of Skulls Ten Cubed
    2018 #38 Jane Eckett Design for Life: Grant and Mary Featherston Heide Museum of Modern Art
    2018 #37 Rex Butler Tom Roberts: Shearing the Rams National Gallery of Victoria
    2018 #36 Victoria Perin Baldessin / Whiteley: Parallel Visions National Gallery of Victoria
    2018 #35 Hester Lyon Architecture Makes Us: Cinematic Visions of Sonia Leber and David Chesworth Centre for Contemporary Photography
    2018 #34 Francis Plagne Robert Smithson: Time Crystals Monash University Museum of Art
    2018 #34 Philip Brophy Robert Smithson: Time Crystals Monash University Museum of Art
    2018 #33 Amelia Winata Nicholas Mangan, Termite Economies Sutton Gallery
    2018 #32 Giles Fielke Philadelphia Wireman World Food Books
    2018 #31 Victoria Perin, David Wlazlo, Amelia Winata Melbourne Art Fair & Spring 1883 Australian Centre for Contemporary Art, Windsor Hotel
    2018 #30 Anna Parlane A Lightness of Spirit is the Measure of Happiness Australian Centre for Contemporary Art
    2018 #29 Giles Fielke, Amelia Winata, Tiarney Miekus Best and Overlooked of 2018 Recess, Ian Potter Museum of Art, Gertrude Contemporary
    2018 #28 Shelley McSpedden Auto Body Works Arts Project Australia
    2018 #27 Rex Butler Colony: Australia 1770–1861 / Frontier Wars National Gallery of Victoria
    2018 #26 Paris Lettau Andrew Browne: Spill Tolarno Galleries
    2018 #25 Jane Eckett The Sculpture Park Point Leo Estate
    2018 #24 Giles Fielke Lucina Lane and Nigel Lendon: Teach the Kids to Strike Neon Parc
    2018 #23 Tim Alves I hope you get this: Raquel Ormella Shepparton Art Museum
    2018 #22 Chelsea Hopper Diane Arbus: American Portraits Heide Museum of Modern Art
    2018 #21 Rex Butler The Field Revisited National Gallery of Victoria
    2018 #20 Anna Parlane Hard Feelings The Honeymoon Suite
    2018 #19 Francis Plagne Abstraction 17: A Field of Interest, c. 1968 Charles Nodrum Gallery
    2018 #18 Eva Birch Kieren Seymour: Blue Blindness Block Projects
    2018 #17 Amelia Winata Natalie Thomas and the Women's Art Register: Finding the Field True Estate Gallery
    2018 #16 David Wlazlo Troy Ramaekers: Double B-Sides Five Walls Projects
    2018 #15 Helen Hughes Vivienne Binns: It is what it is, what it is Sutton Gallery
    2018 #14 Kate Warren Soda_Jerk: TERROR NULLIUS Australian Centre for the Moving Image
    2018 #13 Paris Lettau The Shape of Things to Come Buxton Contemporary
    2018 #12 Victoria Perin Unfinished Business: Perspectives on Art and Feminism Australian Centre for Contemporary Art
    2018 #11 Giles Fielke Samraing Chea: Universal Drawings Reading Room
    2018 #10 Nicholas Tammens Mutlu Çerkez: 1988-2065 Monash University Museum of Art
    2018 #09 Tiarney Miekus Genesis Breyer P-Orridge: Loyalty Does Not End With Death The SUBSTATION
    2018 #08 Anna Parlane Kirsten Lyttle: Digital Mana Centre for Contemporary Photography
    2018 #07 Francis Plagne Tony Clark: Chinoiserie Landscape 1987 - 2017 Murray White Room
    2018 #06 Rex Butler Richard Bell: Dredging up the Past Gertrude Contemporary
    2018 #05 Amelia Winata Kieran Butler and collaborators: Rainbow Bois and Magical Gurls Blindside
    2017 #52 Giles Fielke Triennial National Gallery of Victoria
    2017 #51 Victoria Perin Del Kathryn Barton: The Highway is a Disco National Gallery of Victoria
    2017 #50 Julia Lomas Angela Brennan: Forms of Life Ian Potter Museum of Art
    2017 #49 Kate Warren Cover Versions: Mimicry and Resistance Shepparton Art Museum
    2017 #48 Paris Lettau Our Knowing and Not Knowing: Helen Maudsley Ian Potter Centre: NGV Australia
    2017 #47 Francis Plagne Douglas Lance Gibson: What Was Once Yesterday Today & Tomorrow Tolarno Galleries
    2017 #46 Chelsea Hopper Jenny Watson: The Fabric of Fantasy Heide Museum of Modern Art
    2017 #45 Ian McLean Wayne Eager New Paintings Eastgate Gallery
    2017 #44 Anna Parlane Jason Phu: My Parents Met at the Fish Market Westspace
    2017 #43 Rex Butler Gareth Sansom: Transformer The Ian Potter Centre | NGV Australia
    2017 #42 David Wlazlo Joseph Kosuth: A Short History of My Thought Anna Schwartz Gallery
    2017 #41 Amelia Winata Darren Sylvester: Céline Bus Projects
    2017 #40 Helen Hughes Brent Harris: the small sword Tolarno Galleries
    2017 #39 Kate Warren The Score Ian Potter Museum of Art
    2017 #38 Paris Lettau Isadora Vaughan: Recalcitrant Bodies The Honeymoon Suite
    2017 #37 Francis Plagne Smallness: Trevelyan Clay & Kate Smith Neon Parc, Sutton Gallery
    2017 #36 Audrey Schmidt People Soup Suicidal Oil Piglet
    2017 #35 Anna Parlane Forever Transformed Gertrude Contemporary
    2017 #34 Jane Eckett Sidney Nolan and Elwyn Lynn: A Joint Centenary Charles Nodrum Gallery
    2017 #33 David Wlazlo Future Eaters Monash University Museum of Art
    2017 #32 Beth Kearney Fictitious Realities Bayside Arts and Cultural Centre
    2017 #31 Rex Butler Brave New World: Australia 1930s / Call of the Avant-Garde: Constructivism and Australian Art Heide Museum of Modern Art, Ian Potter Centre: NGV Australia
    2017 #30 Victoria Perin Discovering Dobell / Dobell’s Circle Tarrawarra Museum of Art
    2017 #29 Amelia Winata Spencer Lai: Contaminant, Figures Fort Delta
    2017 #28 Helen Hughes Liam Osborne: Hot Copy Punk Café
    2017 #27 Kylie King Dale Frank Neon Parc
    2017 #26 Francis Plagne Every Brilliant Eye National Gallery of Victoria
    2017 #25 Rex Butler I can see Russia from here TCB art inc.
    2017 #24 Kate Warren Andrea Grützner: Tanztee and Erbgericht Centre for Contemporary Photography
    2017 #23 Giles Fielke On Campus Monash University
    2017 #22 David Wlazlo Restless Margaret Lawrence Gallery
    2017 #21 Anna Parlane Sky Country: Our Connection to the Cosmos Blak Dot Gallery
    2017 #20 Amelia Winata Unproductive Thinking Deakin University Art Gallery
    2017 #19 Anthony White Van Gogh and the Seasons National Gallery of Victoria
    2017 #18 Victoria Perin Harold Freedman: Artist for the People Art Gallery of Ballarat
    2017 #17 Paris Lettau Raafat Ishak & Damiano Bertoli: Hebdomeros Sutton Gallery
    2017 #16 Beth Kearney Bill Henson National Gallery of Victoria
    2017 #15 Helen Hughes James Tylor: un-resettling Vivien Anderson Gallery
    2017 #14 Rex Butler Louise Hearman Tarrawarra Museum of Art
    2017 #13 Julia Lomas Sally Smart: The Choreography of Cutting Sarah Scout Presents
    2017 #12 Giles Fielke Open Spatial Workshop: Converging in Time Monash University Museum of Art
    2017 #11 Kate Warren Daniel Crooks: Parabolic / Miyanaga Akira: REALTIME Anna Schwartz Gallery, National Gallery of Victoria
    2017 #10 Francis Plagne David Hockney: Current National Gallery of Victoria
    2017 #09 David Wlazlo Project 17: Radical Immanence Anna Pappas Gallery
    2017 #08 Anna Parlane Stuart Ringholt: Works on Paper Neon Parc
    2017 #07 Victoria Perin Don't be too Polite: Posters and Activism Ian Potter Museum of Art
    2017 #06 Amelia Winata O’Keeffe, Preston, Cossington-Smith: Making Modernism Heide Museum of Modern Art
    2017 #05 Paris Lettau Sovereignty Australian Centre for Contemporary Art
    2017 #04 Beth Kearney Ramesh Nithiyendran: In the beginning Ian Potter Museum of Art
    2017 #03 Giles Fielke Lucina Lane: Range White Cuberd
    2017 #02 Helen Hughes The Sculpture of Bronwyn Oliver Tarrawarra Museum of Art
    2017 #01 Rex Butler Suzanne Archer: Moving Forwards, Looking Back: A Survey 1969–2016 Nicholas Thompson Gallery
    Virginia Cuppaidge, The Skyspace Paintings 1977 - 1982
    Nicholas Thompson Gallery
    by Jane Eckett
    Callum Morton, Monument #32: Helter Shelter
    Alfred Deakin Place Ballarat
    by Rex Butler
    Ari Tampubolon, Symposia: This show is dedicated to K-pop girl group, TWICE. I love you.
    SEVENTH Gallery
    by Amelia Winata
    Warwick Baker, Hi-Vis Dreams
    Centre for Contemporary Photography
    by Giles Fielke
    Agatha Gothe-Snape, The Outcome is Certain
    Monash University Museum of Art
    by Amelia Wallin
    Alethea Everard, Art show
    Meow2
    by Audrey Schmidt
    Elizabeth Gower, LOCATIONS
    Sutton Gallery, Sutton Projects
    by Chelsea Hopper
    KAWS: Companionship in the Age of Loneliness
    NGV International
    by Paris Lettau
    Assembled: The Art of Robert Klippel
    Tarrawarra Museum of Art
    by Victoria Perin
    Colin McCahon: Letters and Numbers
    National Gallery of Victoria
    by Luke Smythe

    The End.