Anna Parlane
Stuart Ringholt: 'Works on Paper’ at Neon Parc, by Anna Parlane

Stuart Ringholt, Page 215 (detail), 2014, Ink and collage on offset paper, 31.5 x 24 cm

‘Works on Paper’ at Neon Parc by Anna Parlane, Neon Parc Bourke St, 3 February – 11 March 2017

It is a real pleasure to see a show of drawings by an artist primarily known, at least in Melbourne, as the guy who installed a nude disco at the Monash University Museum of Art. Stuart Ringholt’s Works on Paper at Neon Parc comprises a suite of twenty drawings that the artist made in 2014. They are intima...

Victoria Perin
Say it loud. Say it clear: 'Don't be too Polite: Posters and Activism' by Victoria Perin

Julia Church Ordinary women standing up for themselves!..., 1986 colour screenprint. Courtesy of the State Library of Victoria

Don't Be Too Polite: Posters and Activism, The Ian Potter Museum of Art, The University of Melbourne, 8 November 2016–19 March 2017

The title of Don't Be Too Polite: Posters and activism cuts off the gendered call made by the sing-song union ditty: Don't be too polite, girls, don't be too polite / Show a little fight, girls, show a little fight. A sensible (...

Amelia Winata
'O’Keeffe, Preston, Cossington-Smith: Making Modernism' by Amelia Winata

O’Keeffe, Preston, Cossington Smith: Making Modernism Heide Museum of Modern Art, 12 October 2016 - 19 February 2017

Two things are glaringly obvious in just the title of Heide’s Summer exhibition O’Keeffe, Preston, Cossington Smith: Making Modernism. The first, of course, is the apparent refusal of the hegemonic history of modernism: that the pivotal period in art history was shaped by a bunch of dudes. The second is that the curators have attempted to render redundant the cultural cringe...

Paris Lettau
This War Never Ended: 'Sovereignty' at ACCA, by Paris Lettau

Sovereignty, Australian Centre for Contemporary Art, curated by Paola Balla and Max Delany, 17 December 2016 – 26 March 2017

Anyone familiar with contemporary art exhibitions, art fairs and international biennales might notice that Sovereignty just doesn’t quite feel like an exhibition of contemporary art. And it raises one question: Why is this?

It can’t only be explained by Sovereignty’s display of cultural products that aren’t “fine art”, because contemporary art curators regu...